Dog Grooming

How to Trim Your Dog’s Nails

By October 9, 2017 No Comments

Many dog owners try to avoid trimming their dog’s nails. It can be difficult, time-consuming, and frustrating both for the dog and his owner.

Dogs don’t particularly like having their nails messed with, often making it impossible to keep their nails properly trimmed.

Fortunately, active dogs that run and play throughout the day don’t need much nail trimming since they do it naturally. However, indoor breeds do need regular trimming – about once a month according to dog grooming experts in Edmond.

When a dog’s nails get too long:

  • First, long nails can be painful for your dog. As long nails strike the ground, they can cause impact stress on the nail beds and tweak the toepads themselves, causing joint pain. This makes trimming all the more difficult.
  • Nerves in a dog’s feet help him coordinate movements with astounding agility. When his feet hurt because of long nails or the nails caused his toepads not to meet the ground properly, his sense of movement will be affected.
  • Over thousands of years, dogs have adapted to many terrains. On hilly or rocky terrain where their nails grow longer, they adapt to a different sort of posture to keep balance. This “goat on the rock” posture puts extra stress on shoulders and hips that can lead to chronic pain later in life.

Now that it is clear how important nail hygiene is for your dog, let’s discuss how to do it.

  • Use a sharp, scissor-type clipper especially for dog nails. Dog nails are much thicker than human nails, so using a standard nail clipper can cause cracking of the nail and injury. Nail grinders avoid this problem altogether, but the electric noise may startle the dog.
  • Under good lighting, start clipping with the clippers facing the end of the nail. You’re looking to essentially shave off excess length a bit at a time. Don’t try to trim off too much at once. It may take longer, but you’ll get far better results.
  • If the nail is pigmented, you should be able to see a chalky ring along the insensitive part of the nail. This will give you an idea of how far is too far to trim.
  • Use a nail file or emery board to smooth out the edges of each clipped nail.
  • If you clip into the quick of the nail and bleeding occurs, dip the dog’s paw into a bowl of cornstarch to help clot the wound.
    Hopefully, these tips will help you keep your dog happy and healthy without the discomfort.

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